How to photograph architecture?

Today Malta wedding photographer will try to introduce you to my view on architecture photography. Almost 60% of Europeans live in cities, we come from a country where there are many architecturally rich cities, Paris, London, Rome, Madrid, Warsaw and many others, nothing but travel and pleasure to indulge in architectural photography. Well, "with pleasure" is the key expression here, as nothing of this pleasure will be left if you see the effects of your work when you are back home. You probably don't want to see the lack of sharpness of buildings, convergence of vertical lines or other optical distortions. A few tips below are to help you to get the best possible results without using specialized equipment.

 

It is good to get to know the object
It's a really good idea to get to know the building. Walk around the object, see how it looks like from every perspective. Walking around the building peek into the viewfinder, it will make it easier for you later to imagine what the frame looks like. And of course, test different focal lengths.

 

 

Choose the right time
The presentation of an architectural object depends primarily on how the light falls on it. There are a few basic rules. If you would like to get an accurate picture of the whole building, try not to take the picture opposite to the source of light. If you want to get the most out of the visual characteristics of the building, primarily from its texture, the side lighting will be the best option. The effects are best seen in the so-called golden hour. Side lighting at this time gives an extraordinary plasticity of the image.

 

 

Choose the right depth of field
Use large depth of field, i.e. high aperture value. You do not want to get the blurred parts of the photo. Of course, this does not apply when you want to extract a detail of a building, then you do not care about presenting the whole building, but about highlighting the certain element.

 

 

Prevent vertical lines from converging

A very frequent mistake of young adepts of architecture photography is the so-called convergence of vertical lines. If you want to get rid of this effect, the easiest solution will be to move away from the photographed object and position as high as possible at its foot. The best solution would be to take a picture standing halfway up the building, but usually it is impossible, it is difficult to rise to over 100 meters by photographing, for example the Palace of Culture and Science. Of course, you can apply a completely different technique here and with full awareness, take a picture standing at the foot of the building, emphasizing its height. However, this is a deliberate effect.

 

 

Use the appropriate focal length
Growing trend of using wide-angle lenses, in my opinion, usually does not work in the city. As mentioned above, using the angles 14 mm, 18 mm, etc., buildings will simply "collapse" in the pictures. The best way would be to use tilt-shift lenses, these allow you to shift the optical axis, so you can easily correct the perspective in real time. I assume you do not have such a lens when reading this article. Try to use longer focal lengths, 35 mm, 56 mm, and first of all experiment, go out and take pictures of the same building, one by one, focal lengths 14 mm, 35 mm, 56 mm, 85 mm or similar, and see for yourself what effects you get.

 

 

Summary
I hope that the above mini tutorial will help you get the right results. If you have any questions, I invite you, as always, to the discussion.

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